Tag Archives: canine cognition science

The Cunning Game: How Sneaky Is Your Dog?

Imagine you are making a peanut butter and jelly sandwich in your kitchen. Your dog is keeping you company. The phone rings and before you take the call, you tell your dog to not touch your food. Would you trust that your dog would leave your sandwich alone?
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Posted in The Dognition Experience. Tagged with , , .

Rolling Over: What’s Your Dog Saying?

two dogs playing

What does it mean when your dog rolls over while playing with another dog?

Dognition polled 800 people through our social media channels, and 44% of dog parents say their dog rolls over during play with another dog. Are these dogs communicating that they are subordinate to their play partner?

A 2014 study out of University of Lethbridge and University of South Africa looked to see what a dog rolling over to a supine position during play with another dog really means. Does it communicate submission?

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Posted in Dog Life, The Science Behind the Story. Tagged with , , , .

The Science of Self-Control

Dogs and bonobos took part in the self-control study. Photo: Brian Hare

Dogs and bonobos took part in the self-control study. Photo: Brian Hare

 

The blond-headed boy is 4-years old and in pre-school. The adult tells him that the yummy delicious marshmallow in front of him is his to eat now or later. If he waits in the chair until she comes back to eat it, he’ll get rewarded with a second marshmallow. The young boy squirms in his chair, fights the urge to sink his teeth into the gooey sugary treat in front of him, and waits the interminable 10 minutes. The adult who is a child psychologist rewards him with the second marshmallow, and he immediately stuffs both marshmallows into his grinning mouth.
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Dogs’ Internal Compass and Why It Matters

A new study shows that dogs prefer to align in the north-south magnetic field axis when relieving themselves. Photo Credit: Mike Finkelstein

A new study shows that dogs prefer to align in the north-south magnetic field axis when relieving themselves. Photo Credit: Mike Finkelstein

You’ve probably heard by now that your dog has a reason for all that spinning and circling around before picking the perfect spot to excrete. If not, here’s the rundown: German and Czech researchers have found that dogs prefer to align their bodies along the north-south axis of the earth’s magnetic field during excretion. They also found that dogs avoid aligning their bodies along the east-west axis. These findings are from 7,000 observations over a 2 year period of 70 dogs of 37 different breeds defecating and urinating.

You might be wondering, like many others, what’s the big deal? Why does this matter? Continue reading

Posted in The Science Behind the Story. Tagged with , .

Dog burglars: Dogs steal more in the dark

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Dr. Juliane Kaminski, one of our Scientific Advisory Board members, has made a cool finding: dogs are more likely to sneak food from people when the lights are out.

Kaminski, who is a lecturer and research in the Psychology department of the University of Portsmouth, found that dogs were four times more likely to steal food after being told not to if the room was dark.

Kaminski also showed that dogs’ behavior depended on what part of the room was dark. Continue reading

Posted in Citizen Science. Tagged with , , .
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